Welcome to Dan Alexander Dizmentia

Welcome to Dan Alexander Dizmentia
Thank You For Visiting

Frighten Inn Haunted Bed & Breakfast Is A Proud Sponsor of Dan Alexander Dizmentia

Frighten Inn Haunted Bed & Breakfast Is A Proud Sponsor of Dan Alexander Dizmentia
They're Dying To Serve You

Meet the Sea Dragons of OZ and the Yeti Crab

Meet the Sea Dragons of OZ and the Yeti Crab
OZ is shorthand for Australia, and not related to a Wizard

MAN-ATEE AND WOMAN-TARAY: NEW SUPER HEROES SURFACE

MAN-ATEE AND WOMAN-TARAY: NEW SUPER HEROES SURFACE
Join the Crime Wave

Bad Biker Kitties Are On The Prowl

Bad Biker Kitties Are On The Prowl
Join The Kitten Motorcycle Gang

Formula Juan Racer: Numero Uno!

Formula Juan Racer: Numero Uno!
A Real Wild Juan

Wednesday, January 3, 2018

Six Flags AutoWorld: Totaled Michigan Motor City


In 1984, Six Flags AutoWorld debuted in Flint, Michigan.  Unlike the famous Six Flags parks that feature roller coasters and thrills, AutoWorld was an indoor experience.  It appears to have been sort of a mix of EPCOT's old World of Motion pavilion, plus the original version of its replacement, Test Track.  And it even had a dash of Disneyland's old America Sings animated animal show.


AutoWorld was nothing like the traditional Six Flags parks.  It looked more like a museum or a science center.


Michigan had high hopes for AutoWorld.  Sadly, the new car smell was gone by 1985.


At the time, Six Flags was experimenting and diversifying with new types of attractions that were not traditional amusement parks.


In 1985, another experimental attraction, Six Flags PowerPlant, opened in Baltimore, Maryland.  It also was short-lived (I got to visit the corpse of PowerPlant in 2000, as it had transformed into a shopping center).

Like a mall or a museum, AutoWorld's fun could be had on different levels.


AutoWorld brings to mind the Children's Museum of Indianapolis.


You can actually see Test Track at AutoWorld!  A remote control Test Track, that is.


Was AutoWorld ahead of its time?  Maybe.


The Great Race seems to share DNA with the original version of Walt Disney World's Test Track.

The Humorous History of Auto-Mobility seems very similar to EPCOT's World of Motion.


This attraction screams old school Disney.

Speaking of Disney, AutoWorld had its own mascot.  Not a cartoon car.  That would be too logical.  AutoWorld had a Horse.  A crazy looking horse.  And he hosted the Humorous History of Auto-Mobility.


Fred the Carriageless Horse!  Of course!

Fred existed in some sort of animated, three dimensional form at AutoWorld.  I'm guessing it was a robot.


Fred seems to be a relative of the Old Grey Mare driving a Model T from the 1974 Disneyland Audio Animatronics show, America Sings.


Poor Fred was probably sold to the glue factory.

Six Flags AutoWorld seemed like a clever idea.


I feel like AutoWorld was built in the wrong location, and at the wrong time.

You know that if this was Hot Wheels AutoWorld, or Matchbox AutoWorld, or Disney-PIXAR Cars AutoWorld it would have been a big hit.

2 comments:

  1. Fascinating! I had never heard of this place until now. Does the AutoWorld building still exist today in some form? I hope you plan to do a post on that Six Flags PowerPlant attraction! And I hope it wasn't a "nuclear" Power Plant with everyone getting radiated for free.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks, TokyoMagic! The AutoWorld building lasted for some time, but was demolished. I don't have much information about Six Flags PowerPlant. When I visited the PowerPlant site in 2000, I did not take any pictures (no smart phone back then!) so I missed an opportunity. What I have seen of PowerPlant looks like "SteamPunk" entertainment that is so popular right now. And no, I don't think PowerPlant was a Nuclear Power Plant. That would have been awesome, though. I feel like Six Flags Nuclear PowerPlant would be fun.

    ReplyDelete